News & Notes

Curl Up With a Horrifying Book!

Just in time for Halloween, we have a new two volume set you might want to check out called The Century's Best Horror Fiction.  It's edited by John Pelan and published by Cemetery Dance Publication.  The call number is PN6120.95.H727 C46 2011, and it's located on the second floor of King.  The editor selected one story published during each year of the 20th Century.  There was only one selection per author and one selection per year.  Booklist describes this book as an "intoxicating reading experience."  Some of the authors included in this collection are H. G. Wells, Algernon Blackwood, M. R. James, E. F. Benson, Lord Dunsany, H. P. Lovecraft, and Shirley Jackson.  I found the selections from the beginning of the century especially intriguing!

If you're interested in reading other horror stories for Halloween, you might be interested in some of these titles:

The Year's best fantasy and horror.  King Library (2nd floor) | PN6120.95.F25 Y4

Darkness: two decades of modern horror edited by Ellen Datlow.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS648.H6 D378 2010

Zombies: the recent dead edited by Paula Guran. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6120.95.H727 Z65 2010 

American fantastic tales: terror and the uncanny from the 1940s to now edited by Peter Straub.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS648.H6 A46 2009

Enjoy All Hallow's Read!

Alternative Press Index with Archive

One of our newest resources, Alternative Press Index with Archive, is now available for Oxford campus users only. This EBSCOhost resource is a bibliographic database of journal, newspaper, and magazine articles. Coverage in API Archive spans 1969-1990, and API’s coverage begins in 1991. Content comes from 700+ international alternative, radical, and left periodicals. View the complete lists of periodicals in both API and API Archive by selecting the Publications tab in the database toolbar.

Topics covered include theories and practices of socialism, revolution, ecology, democracy, anarchism, feminism, organized labor, indigenous peoples, and gay and lesbian issues. Oxford campus users can access Alternative Press Index with Archives from the following link: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/1080

Open Access Resources Available via MU Libraries

Currently, there is a dizzying array of open access resources available to students and scholars online, and it is often difficult to determine the quality of these resources. In order to make users aware of quality open access resources, the library has identified specific resources and added entries and links for these resources to our website and catalog. In the Databases A to Z list, there are links to a number of high quality sources of open access materials.

ArXiv is a repository hosted by Cornell University which includes open access to more than 700,000 e-prints in physics, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, and statistics.

The Directory of Open Access Journals is an aggregation of over 7,000 online journals across all subjects which are peer reviewed or have editorial quality control.

ProQuest’s Dissertations and Theses Open provides the full text of open access dissertations and theses free of charge (the authors of these theses and dissertations have opted to publish as open access).

Additional freely available full-text dissertations can be found at the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, where numerous participating institutions deposit dissertations.

At the FDSYS site, you’ll find open access to authenticated information directly from the United States Government through the Government Printing Office.

If you’re interested in electronic books, the National Academies Press has made PDFs of the majority of its publications (over 4,000 monographs) freely available at their website. These monographs consist of reports published by various government academies, including the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and the National Research Council. Registration is free and required before your first download from the site.

Another place to access quality open access electronic books is from the Directory of Open Access Books, which is a service of the OAPEN Foundation. The OAPEN Foundation is an international initiative dedicated to Open Access monograph publishing, based at the National Library in The Hague. DOAB contains more than 1,000 academic peer-reviewed books from more than two dozen publishers.

In our Journals A to Z list, you will find links for many open access journals, identifiable by the presence of a small globe icon and the text “Open Access”. If you are browsing the library’s online catalog, a keyword search on “open access” under the Journal Titles tab will bring up entries for numerous open access journals available online.

Why Open Access Matters for Humanists

Many humanists believe that the debates raging around open access in the natural sciences are not related to them. "Our research is not usually funded by tax payers," they say. "Unlike the STEM disciplines, our journals have a reasonable subscription price," they argue. And both of these arguments are factually correct. However, the serials crisis caused by rising journal prices and shrinking library budgets indirectly impacts humanities scholars and their ability to access the peer-reviewed scholarly literature in their fields.

When libraries are faced with the need to cut journal subscriptions due to rising costs or budget reductions, they don't simply cut the most expensive items. What they do is look at usage data to locate those journals which are used the least and cut enough of those subscriptions to make up the difference. In other words, we cut off the "long tail." And although some humanities titles see high usage, the bulk of this "long tail" are specialized titles in the humanities. And it is in these titles were humanists try the groundbreaking new approaches that shape their fields. But given the undergraduate-heavy usage patterns at Miami, these titles see less use than similar journals in the sciences and social sciences. So, the rapidly rising costs of journals in other disciplines does have an impact on access to humanities research.

What can scholars do about this? Humanists could publish their research in one of the many open access journals in their field, but they may not be as prestigious as more traditional titles. Subscription revenue is important to the continued survival of academic societies so many journals have been reluctant to switch to an open access model. This being said, many journals in the humanities allow their authors to self-archive a copy of the final published version of their articles in an institutional repository. Even those journals without an express statement of support for self-archiving in their copyright transfer agreement (CTA) will usually allow authors to post their work online in some form if asked via an author addendum to the CTA. Miami's Scholars Portal and the connected Scholarly Commons is Miami's institutional repository. Posting your work in Scholarly Commons not only increases access to your research by other scholars, but also allows other interested parties to read your work. In other words, the general public who lives without access to academic journals will be able to access your research. Additionally, the Scholars Portal allows Miami faculty to create profiles to provide a public face for the work contained in the Scholarly Commons. These profiles have a persistant easy to remember URL as well as basic profile and contact information. If you would like some assistance in creating your Scholars Portal profile and getting your work added to the Scholarly Commons, please contact Jen Waller at wallerjl@muohio.edu.

Additional Resources

It's Open Access Week!

Today marks the start of Open Access Week! Libraries around the world will spend this week celebrating open access principles, and Miami's libraries are no exception. Just a few things on tap this week include:

  • Free "Ask me about Open Access" buttons available at service desks throughout the libraries.
  • A display in the foyer of King Library that answers, "What are all these locks for?"
  • A free webcast of the SPARC/WorldBank panel discussion, "Perspectives on Open Access: Practice, Progress, and Pitfalls" in King 114 on Monday, 10/22/12, from 4:00pm-5:30pm.
  • A free Digital Humanities Symposium on Tuesday, 10/23/12, from 3:00pm - 6:30pm in King 320 (see http://libguides.lib.muohio.edu/digital-humanities )
  • A free presentation, "How Open Scholarship is Changing Research," by William Gunn, Ph.D. and Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley. 4:30pm-5:30pm on Thursday, 10/25/12, in McGuffey 322 (see http://staff.lib.muohio.edu/~revellaa/gunn.html )

For information about these events and links to other open access resources, please go to http://staff.lib.muohio.edu/~revellaa/2012oa.html.

Happy Open Access Week!

The Kelmscott Chaucer in Special Collections

Miami's Walter Havighurst Special Collections is happy to announce the recent acquisition of one of the most famous private press books ever printed.  Issued in 1896 by William Morris's Kelmscott Press, The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer is considered the crowning achievement of Morris's press and is arguably one of the most beautifully designed books in the history of printing.  William Morris was a leading figure in the Arts and Crafts Movement of the late 19th century when he founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891.  Seeking to return to traditional forms of craftsmanship and inspired by folklore and medieval literature, Morris's book design choices, including his typeface design, placement of the text, and choice of ink color, were heavily influenced by the aesthetics of medieval manuscripts and early printed books.

Though Morris's trademark heavily decorated borders and elegant illuminations are found throughout the text, the gorgeous eighty-seven illustrations were contributed by the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones.  The text of the collected works of the 14th century "father of English literature" was drawn from the 1894 Clarendon Press edition edited by Walter Skeat.  Morris did not seek to compete with this new edition, but instead used the text as the basis for his own work of art.  His original plan only called for 325 paper copies, but, due to demand, the printing run was extended to 425 copies.  There were also an additional 13 copies printed on vellum.

Miami's copy is, as a bookseller describes it, "a remarkably well-preserved copy" with the leaves in pristine condition.  Though many copies of the Kelmscott Chaucer have elaborate bindings, our copy has the more modest original holland-backed blue paper boards, with paper spine label.

 

We're very excited to add this landmark volume to our collection and look forward to showcasing it in future class visits and exhibits.  Special Collections already has some Kelmscott Press titles in our collection, but this acquisition certainly enhances our collection of private press titles.  It's a true treasure!

Kimberly Tully
Special Collections Librarian
 

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Cinema and Media Studies

Access to Oxford Bibliographies Online: Cinema and Media Studies is now available. If you’re working on a research paper for your film studies, theater, or digital game studies class, this is the perfect place to start. This resource offers 70+ peer-reviewed guides focusing on a wide variety of topics. Some examples of topics include: Acting, YouTube, Censorship, Reality Television and much, much more. Each guide is authored by cinema and media studies scholars, and includes a general overview of the topic and detailed list of important related books, articles, and websites.

Access this resource from the A-Z Databases list or the following link: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/1077

Other available Oxford Bibliographies Online resources include:

NEW! Oxford Bibliographies Online: Childhood Studies

NEW! Oxford Bibliographies Online: International Relations

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Communication

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Islamic Studies

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Latin American Studies

"What is Digital Humanities?" Symposium

The Miami University Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship will be hosting a Digital Humanities Symposium on Tuesday October 23rd from 3:00-6:30 in King 320. This half day symposium will introduce faculty, graduate students and librarians to the field of Digital Humanities and begin a dialogue around related issues among interested parties on campus. We have invited two speakers who can shed light on the theories, practices, challenges and controversies and help us begin to examine the potential for Digital Humanities scholarship at Miami University.  This symposium is being sponsored by the Miami University Humanities Center.

Our two speakers will be H. Lewis Ulman, Associate Professor of English and the Director of Digital Media Studies at Ohio State University, and Angela Courtney, Associate Librarian and Head, Arts and Humanities at Indiana University.  H. Lewis Ulman has worked on the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives and will be talking about "What difference does 'digital' make to the humanities?".  Angela Courtney has worked on the Victorian Women Writers Project and will be talking about the collaborations that can happen between libraries and departments around digital humanities projects.

In addition to our two speakers, we will have a presentation about our new Center for Digital Scholarship, demos of projects, and a roundtable of Miami University faculty discussing their projects.  We will have faculty from a variety of departments, including Classics and English.  We will also have refreshments and time for conversation!

We hope to see you there.  If you are interested in attending, please consider filling out our registration form.  It's not required, but it will help us get an idea of who is coming.  Also, feel free to e-mail Arianne Hartsell-Gundy at hartsea@muohio.edu if you have any questions.

Remembering Katrina

                              

Hurricane season! Occasionally we get a taste in southwestern Ohio, such as tropical storm Isaac bringing rain a few weeks ago. Coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic and in the Caribbean know more fully the effects of these storms. One of the best-known is Katrina, which hit the Mississippi and Louisiana coasts on 27 August, 2005. The wind, the storm surge that it pushed inland, and the strains on the protection infrastructure in New Orleans devastated the region and the city. A month later, on 24 September, Rita came ashore near the Louisiana/Texas border, causing yet more damage, and impeding recovery and evacuation efforts of the earlier storm. Katrina remains the costliest storm in US history, with damages at about $108 billion. Rita’s damage was over $12 billion. Over 1200 deaths were attributed to Katrina, and more than 60 have been attributed to Rita.

Miami University Libraries have many materials in the collections. Search by subject: “Hurricane Katrina, 2005”. Here is a very small sampling, arrannged by library location.

The New Orleans Hurricane Protection System : What Went Wrong and Why : a Report, by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hurricane Katrina External Review Panel. BEST Library, Oversized, Basement | TH1096 .N49 2007

In Katrina's Wake : Portraits of Loss from an Unnatural Disaster, photographs by Chris Jordan ; essays by Bill McKibben and Susan Zakin ; poems by Victoria Sloan Jordan. BEST Library, Folio, Basement | QC945 .J63 2006

Just Seconds from the Ocean : Coastal Living in the Wake of Katrina. BEST Library, Basement | GB460.A2 S27 2007

Cooking Up a Storm : Recipes Lost and Found from The Times-Picayune of New Orleans. BEST Library, Basement | TX715.2.L68 C66 2008. From the summary:

“… After Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, tens of thousands of people lost their keepsakes and family treasures forever. As residents started to rebuild their lives, The Times-Picayune of New Orleans became a post-hurricane swapping place for old recipes that were washed away in the storm …”

Architecture in Times of Need : Make It Right Rebuilding New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward.  ArtArch | NA735.N5 A73 2009

 Katrina Personal Ojects; photographs by Jarret Schecter.  ArtArch | HV636 2005.G85 K28 2008

 Groove Interrupted : Loss, Renewal, and the Music of New Orleans.  Music Library | ML385 .S635 2011

 Devil Sent the Rain : Music and Writing in Desperate America.  Music Library | ML3477 .P49 2011

 Hurricane Katrina : the Storm that Changed America, with an introduction by Wynton Marsalis.  King Library (2nd floor) | HV636 2005 .U6 H87 2005

Clear as Mud : Planning for the Rebuilding of New Orleans.  King Library (2nd floor) | HT168 .N49 O47 2010

Old and New Media after Katrina. King Library (2nd floor) | HV636 2005.G85 O43 2010

 Racing the Storm : Racial Implications and Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina.  King Library (2nd floor) | HV636 2005 .N4 R33 2007

 The Children Hurricane Katrina Left Behind : Schooling Context, Professional Preparation, and Community Politics.  King Library (2nd floor) | LC2771 .C45 2007

 After the Flood, by Robert Polidori.  King Folio | F379.N543 P655 2006

 Race, Place, and Environmental Justice after Hurricane Katrina : Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast.  King Library (2nd floor) | HV551.4.N48 R34 2009

 Home Team : Coaching the Saints and New Orleans Back to Life, Sean Payton and Ellis Henican.  King Library (2nd floor) | GV939.P388 A3 2010

In addition to studies such as these, literary works of fiction, poetry and drama are available.

 City Without People : the Katrina Poems, by Niyi Osundare.  King Library (2nd floor) | PR9387.9.O866 C58 2011

 Katrina on Stage : Five Plays.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS627.H87 K38 2011

 The Tin Roof Blowdown : a Dave Robicheaux Novel, by James Lee Burke.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS3552.U723 T56 2007

 Ninth Ward, by Jewell Parker Rhodes.  King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PZ7.R3476235 Ni 2010

There are also resources available online, especially from government agencies.

Terrestrial LIDAR Datasets of New Orleans, Louisiana, Levee Failures from Hurricane Katrina, August 29, 2005.  This is also available as a CD-ROM from BEST Library, maps collection | I 19.121:470

 Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast Building Performance Observations, Recommendations, and Technical Guidance : Mitigation Assessment Team Report.  This is also available as a CD-ROM at King – Government & Law | HS 5.120:K 15/CD

 Lessons Learned EPA's Response to Hurricane Katrina-Evaluation Report.

Web resources of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provide data and information.

Hurricane Katrina special report, includes PDF, images, and text.

Hurricane Katrina home page, includes satellite images, aftermath photos, maps, data and other resources.

NOAA’s National Weather Service includes the National Hurricane Center, providing current and historical information, forecasts, tracking maps, etc.

Happy Homecoming! Happy Hobbit Day!

To all Miami alums, welcome back!

This weekend the statue of Coach Paul Brown was unveiled in the Cradle of Coaches Plaza; in honor of the occasion we have a display of Paul Brown materials from the Cradle of Coaches Collection in the case outside Special Collections, on the 3rd floor of King Library. (Because the case is outside our secure area, these are facsimiles of the originals.) We hope you can stop by and enjoy the display as you stroll about on this beautiful fall weekend - before or after the game, of course. Go Redhawks!

And, as if that weren't enough reason to celebrate, 75 years ago today (Friday) J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit was published. Tolkien, a professor at Oxford University, created an incredibly rich, strange, yet familiar mythic world that we still enjoy exploring: hence the upcoming film trilogy from Peter Jackson.

Special Collections is proud to possess a first edition of The Hobbit in our collection, although sadly lacking the dustjacket. Last year it was one of the most popular selections by students assigned to analyze a modern first edition for an English 490 class.

Whether you are journeying through your own college memories or adventuring out of the Shire in search of dragons, the staff of Special Collections wish you a wonderful weekend.

Elizabeth Brice
Assistant Dean for Technical Services and
Head, Special Collections & Archives

 

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