Web Research Resources

Top 5 Digital Research Resources for Marketers and other @FarmerSchoolMU Students

What is it that separates great marketers from the pack? Great information. The kind of information and data you can't always find on the open web. That said, we give you the top 5 digital research resources:

  1. Factiva

    Factiva includes full-text coverage of all the major US and international newspapers including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, London Times, etc.

  2. Business Source Complete

    Business Source Complete contains thousands, yes thousands, of popular and scholarly business journals.

  3. Hoover's

    Hoover's provides contact information and summary data for over 18 million US and international companies. Data for the 40,000 largest companies includes company histories, competitors, financial data, stock information, etc.

  4. Mediamark

    Mediamark is a database of US consumer survey data that provides information on who consumes what, and connects that to the consumers' demographics and media usage. It also is a source of market share data.

  5. Marketline

    Marketline is an excellent source for US and international market research reports, company reports, including SWOT analyses, and country reports.

Education Week Trial

Miami University Libraries is currently offering a trial of Education Week, a top online site for preK-12 education news. The trial includes access to the following resources:

  • The latest issue of Education Week, posted several days in advance of the cover date
  • Complete and searchable Education Week archives all the way back to volume 1, 1981
  • Online-only news and analysis from Education Week journalists and newswire sources
  • “Commentary” articles by top educators, policymakers, and thought leaders
  • Special reports and topical coverage
  • 20+ blogs on a variety of education topics
  • State and district level data
  • Digital Directions and the Teacher Professional Development Sourcebook
  • Webinars and expert chat events

Readers can also sign up to receive e-newsletters on a range of topics covering teacher insights, educational technology, curriculum, and professional tips. The trial runs through October.

Please email questions and feedback to Kate Lucey, Education Librarian.

Reading Social

I always feel one of the joys of reading is that it is a quiet solitary activity.  It can be a chance to reflect and to escape into another world.  Still it can be a lot of fun to share your reading experiences with other people.  The following list are online tools and social media outlets for sharing what you are reading and to learn what others are learning.

First there's the really fun #fridayreads hashtag on Twitter.  You simply post whatever you are reading on Friday with the hashtag #fridayreads.  You can then search the hashtag and see what other people are reading too.  You can find out more on their website.  You can also join their Facebook page.

You can get involved with the community at GoodReads.  There you can post what you've already read, what you are reading at any given time and how far along you are in the book, and what you would like to read.  You can also follow friends and authors.  There are online book clubs, book recommendations, and book lists.  There is also Shelfari and LibraryThing.  They each have a slightly different focus, but they do encourage communities of book lovers.

There are also online groups and projects that you can participate in.  One example is Book Drum, an interactive crowd-sourced literary world map.  Another fun project is BookCrossing. Basically you register and label a book you own through their website.  Then you share the book by giving it to someone or leaving it somewhere.  After that you can follow the book as it gets passed along.  You could also participate in World Book Night in April.  In this program 30 books are chosen every year.  Then people can sign up to personally hand out 20 copies of a particular title in their community.  The goal is to hand out books to people who are either light or non-readers. 

There are a lot of great book blogs that you can follow and comment on.  Here are some recommendations: The Book Lady's Blog, Omnivoracious, Three Guys One Book, and Book Riot (my personal favorite).  You can also look to see if your favorite author maintains a blog.  For example, John Green actively engages with his readers on his website.

Here's an interesting article about Facebook Apps that you might want to check out.

These book tools are less about sharing what you read and more about receiving suggestions on other things to read: Book Lamp 5 Websites That Alert Book Lovers About New Book Releases, and Reading suggestion engines: Your next read.

I hope this post has given you some inspiration on how to read socially!  Happy reading!

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Geologic Map Day

October 19 is National Geologic Map Day.  This is a recognition of the significance of this form of mapping, that seeks to map the earth beneath the surface.  These maps convey important information about the geology of regions.  They are also esthetically pleasing uses of color and shape.

In recognition, the United States Geological Survey releases a greatly revised resource, the National Geological Map Database, which provides access to a large database of geological maps through a Map Catalog, of over 90,000 maps from the USGS as well as more than 600 other publishers.  A new Map Viewer offers an additional discovery tool.  Another important resource at this site is Stratigraphy to identify geological names, charts and guidelines.

Miami University Libraries has geological maps in various forms, both digital and in print format.  The Geology subject guide includes the page Geological Mapping, that describes many of these publications, maps, and resources.  USGS maps, maps by the Ohio Geological Survey, and various recently published maps by other state geological surveys are descibed here.  Included are several recent maps, as well as classic maps that have retained importance through the years.  To find such resources in the catalog, a Subject search with the terms "Geology," regional name, and "Maps."  For example , the 2005 Geologic Map of North America is listed with the subject Geology - North America - Maps.  This will also retrieve the related Database of the Geologic Map of North America.  Both of these items are in the Libraries collections, as well as available as web pages at the USGS site.

Books about geologic mapping are available with the subject Geological mapping.  A book by Simon Winchester, The Map that Changed the World : William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology, describes the creation of the world's first geological map, of Great Britain, in the early decades of the 1800s.  Reproductions of two versions of this map are on view in the Geology Department in Shideler Hall.  Other siginifcant geological maps are viewable there, as well as in the Libraries collections.

Remembering Katrina

                              

Hurricane season! Occasionally we get a taste in southwestern Ohio, such as tropical storm Isaac bringing rain a few weeks ago. Coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic and in the Caribbean know more fully the effects of these storms. One of the best-known is Katrina, which hit the Mississippi and Louisiana coasts on 27 August, 2005. The wind, the storm surge that it pushed inland, and the strains on the protection infrastructure in New Orleans devastated the region and the city. A month later, on 24 September, Rita came ashore near the Louisiana/Texas border, causing yet more damage, and impeding recovery and evacuation efforts of the earlier storm. Katrina remains the costliest storm in US history, with damages at about $108 billion. Rita’s damage was over $12 billion. Over 1200 deaths were attributed to Katrina, and more than 60 have been attributed to Rita.

Miami University Libraries have many materials in the collections. Search by subject: “Hurricane Katrina, 2005”. Here is a very small sampling, arrannged by library location.

The New Orleans Hurricane Protection System : What Went Wrong and Why : a Report, by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hurricane Katrina External Review Panel. BEST Library, Oversized, Basement | TH1096 .N49 2007

In Katrina's Wake : Portraits of Loss from an Unnatural Disaster, photographs by Chris Jordan ; essays by Bill McKibben and Susan Zakin ; poems by Victoria Sloan Jordan. BEST Library, Folio, Basement | QC945 .J63 2006

Just Seconds from the Ocean : Coastal Living in the Wake of Katrina. BEST Library, Basement | GB460.A2 S27 2007

Cooking Up a Storm : Recipes Lost and Found from The Times-Picayune of New Orleans. BEST Library, Basement | TX715.2.L68 C66 2008. From the summary:

“… After Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, tens of thousands of people lost their keepsakes and family treasures forever. As residents started to rebuild their lives, The Times-Picayune of New Orleans became a post-hurricane swapping place for old recipes that were washed away in the storm …”

Architecture in Times of Need : Make It Right Rebuilding New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward.  ArtArch | NA735.N5 A73 2009

 Katrina Personal Ojects; photographs by Jarret Schecter.  ArtArch | HV636 2005.G85 K28 2008

 Groove Interrupted : Loss, Renewal, and the Music of New Orleans.  Music Library | ML385 .S635 2011

 Devil Sent the Rain : Music and Writing in Desperate America.  Music Library | ML3477 .P49 2011

 Hurricane Katrina : the Storm that Changed America, with an introduction by Wynton Marsalis.  King Library (2nd floor) | HV636 2005 .U6 H87 2005

Clear as Mud : Planning for the Rebuilding of New Orleans.  King Library (2nd floor) | HT168 .N49 O47 2010

Old and New Media after Katrina. King Library (2nd floor) | HV636 2005.G85 O43 2010

 Racing the Storm : Racial Implications and Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina.  King Library (2nd floor) | HV636 2005 .N4 R33 2007

 The Children Hurricane Katrina Left Behind : Schooling Context, Professional Preparation, and Community Politics.  King Library (2nd floor) | LC2771 .C45 2007

 After the Flood, by Robert Polidori.  King Folio | F379.N543 P655 2006

 Race, Place, and Environmental Justice after Hurricane Katrina : Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast.  King Library (2nd floor) | HV551.4.N48 R34 2009

 Home Team : Coaching the Saints and New Orleans Back to Life, Sean Payton and Ellis Henican.  King Library (2nd floor) | GV939.P388 A3 2010

In addition to studies such as these, literary works of fiction, poetry and drama are available.

 City Without People : the Katrina Poems, by Niyi Osundare.  King Library (2nd floor) | PR9387.9.O866 C58 2011

 Katrina on Stage : Five Plays.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS627.H87 K38 2011

 The Tin Roof Blowdown : a Dave Robicheaux Novel, by James Lee Burke.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS3552.U723 T56 2007

 Ninth Ward, by Jewell Parker Rhodes.  King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PZ7.R3476235 Ni 2010

There are also resources available online, especially from government agencies.

Terrestrial LIDAR Datasets of New Orleans, Louisiana, Levee Failures from Hurricane Katrina, August 29, 2005.  This is also available as a CD-ROM from BEST Library, maps collection | I 19.121:470

 Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast Building Performance Observations, Recommendations, and Technical Guidance : Mitigation Assessment Team Report.  This is also available as a CD-ROM at King – Government & Law | HS 5.120:K 15/CD

 Lessons Learned EPA's Response to Hurricane Katrina-Evaluation Report.

Web resources of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provide data and information.

Hurricane Katrina special report, includes PDF, images, and text.

Hurricane Katrina home page, includes satellite images, aftermath photos, maps, data and other resources.

NOAA’s National Weather Service includes the National Hurricane Center, providing current and historical information, forecasts, tracking maps, etc.

FRED App – Economic data goes mobile

Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED) is now available as a FREE app for iOS and Android Devices. http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2012/08/fred-app/ Access 42,000 economic data series from 38 regional, national and international sources on your phone or iPad. Users can also email data series or graphs or post them directly to Twitter or Facebook. A great resource for economists and anyone needing data just got easier and more convenient to use.

Journal Citation Reports and Other Tools for Preparing Your Dossier - Workshop on 2/21

Do you know the difference between an impact factor and an Eigenfactor? Do you know how to find out which journals in your field are considered the most influential? If not, then you might want to come to an upcoming workshop called "Journal Citation Reports and Other Tools for Preparing Your Dossier". This workshop is designed for faculty and graduate students who want to learn more about the citation tools available to help them. We'll cover the basics of Journal Citation Reports, discuss the useful tools in Web of Science, and realizing that not all journals are covered in JCR and WoS, we’ll also cover tools such as SciMago, Publish or Perish, Google Scholar, and WorldCat Identities.

By the end of the session we hope you’ll have gained:

• Awareness of the different tools available
• Understanding of the value of these different citation analysis tools
• Ability to select the best tool for any given task
• Understanding of vocabulary like impact factors
• Skills to gather citation information and include them in their promotion documents

This workshop is designed to be informative for all disciplines at Miami, and will be jointly led by a Humanities Librarian and a Social Science Librarian.

Lunch will be provided!

Where: King 110
When: February 21nd from noon-1:00pm

Register here: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/workshops/register/682

Campus Safety and Security Data

I was fortunate to be invited as a guest speaker for several sections of IMS (Interactive Media Studies) 201 this semester. My presentation "How to Find, Use and Evaluation Numeric Data" introduced information in numeric format such as censuses and survey data to students.

An idea came to me when I was preparing for the presentation this year - There is a growing interest in the IT industry about data visualization and there are lot of free web-based application such as Google Chart Tools, Google Maps and Sourcemap [link] that can be used to present numeric data in a more informative way. Therefore I decided to come up with an in-class exercise that invites the students to explore both the world of numeric information and ways to present it. The topic I decided to use for this exercise was "Campus Safety in Public Universities in Ohio." I felt that was a topic that relates to student life and they can use the information they find both in and outside of the classroom. The students searched and compiled crime statistics from public universities in Ohio and present the findings on the map below. Each red dot represent an university and users can click on the dot to view detail information.

[Note: Data presented on this map was gathered collectively by students for an in-class exercise. The accuracy of the data was not cross-checked.]

The Penn State sex abuse scandal has stirred up a lot of discussion lately. Postsecondary institutions are required by law (the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Higher Education Opportunity Act) to report numbers of criminal offenses, hate crimes, arrests, disciplinary actions and fire incidents to the Department of Education. Postsecondary institutions are also required to make campus safety information available to the public. For example, Miami University has a Campus Safety and Security page [link] that shares information on crime statistics, emergency procedures, etc.. However, considering how "attractive" this type of statistics might be, they are often hard to find on universities and colleges' website (most definitely never linked directly from homepages). Which prompted me to share the data resources that IMS 201 students used to collect data on campus safety in Ohio public universities.

  • College Navigator [link]

    Maintained by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), College Navigator can be used to search for information such as enrollment, tuition and campus safety on nearly 7,000 colleges and universities.

  • The Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool [link]

    Maintained by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the Department of Education, this online tool can be used to generate customized reports based on crime statistics and fire statistics. For example, click here [link] to see the statistics for Penn State.

    It is also worth mentioning that the California Postsecondary Education Commission [link] created a separate web-based tool for crime statistics for all California institutions. This tool allows users to produce graphs and to limit searches to a geographic region or county. However, the data available from this tool will no longer be updated due to the fact that the California Postsecondary Education Commission has closed because budget cuts.

    If you are interested to find more information about the topic of campus safety and security in postsecondary education, you should visit the Campus Security page [link] on the U.S. Department of Education website.

Data from Ohio Election Results

The Ohio General Election was held yesterday, November 8, 2011. A total of 3,545,539 registered voters went to polling locations and decided on 3 statewide issues and 1,734 local issues. The voter turnout was 46% (or 45.99%) and the turnout was considered to be high for an odd-year election. It makes me wonder where and how users can locate data about elections in Ohio in particular historical data.

You can view Ohio election results from 1940 to present via Ohio Secretary of State website [link]. You can also access historical (18th century to present) data about voter turnout and elected officials on the same site. The Ohio Secretary of State also released voter turnout from yesterday by county [link]. I am excited to see that they provide a downloadable spreadsheet version [link] which helps users to conduct further analysis or create data visualization on their own.

I've also created a Google Spreadsheet that lists General Election voter turnout in Ohio from 1978 to the election yesterday [download].

If you wish to find out more historical data on Ohio elections, there are some print resources in King Library Reference collection that you might find interesting:

  • A statistical history of the American electorate. [King Reference, JK1967 .R87 2001]
  • State and national voting in Federal elections, 1910-1970. [King Reference, JK1965 .C59]

New titles from the US Federal Government

The branches and agencies of the US Government produce a wealth of information. Here are a few of the newest titles accessible through the Miami University Libraries and the internet.

Recent events in Pakistan may have you interested in international geography. If so you may want to check out the most recent Central Intelligence Agency produced maps of Pakistan. These maps cover geography, administrative divisions, and physiography and are available at the Science Library and Online. For general information on Pakistan and any other country the best place to start is another CIA title, The World Fact Book (MU Libraries / online).

Some recent Congressional Hearings focusing on international cooperation, US involvement in other nations and post conflict reconstruction:

For some reading on historical events and conflicts there is the new title Engineers at War by Adrian G. Traas from the US Army Center of Military History.

For some quieter reading try Rain Gardens: Capturing and Using the Rains of the Great Plains (.pdf), available online from the US Natural Resources Conservation Service.

If none of these titles are of interest but are something you wouldn't have thought would be produced by the United States Government, you can browse all of the Government Information & Law Department's newest acquisitions through the library catalog.

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