hartsea's blog

Honoring Maya Angelou

Angelou Poet and political activist Maya Angelou died today (May 28th).  You can read obituaries and commemorations here, here, and here.  You might also enjoy this collection of some of her best quotes (warning: video will play automatically).  I also think this NPR profile from 2008 will be useful in understanding her impact on society.

You may also want to read some of her works for yourself:

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 Z466 1970 

The Complete Collected Poems of Maya AngelouKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 A17 1994

And Still I RiseKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 A8

Mom & Me & MomKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 Z46 2013

On the Pulse of MorningKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 O53 1993

Phenomenal Woman: Four Poems Celebrating WomenKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 P48 1994

Celebrations: Rituals of Peace and PrayerKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 C45 2006

"Nothing can dim the light which shines from within."

Bridging Cultures: Art, Architecture, and Film

     

As we wrap up the school year, we are wrapping our Muslim Journeys programs.  The final collection I want to highlight is the Art, Architecture, and Film collection.  In this collection we have:

Koran by Heart (2011), directed by Greg Barker

Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World (2011), directed by Robert Gardner

Prince Among Slaves (2007), directed by Andrea Kalin

Islamic Art Spots (short films designed, written, and presented by D. Fairchild Ruggles, developed especially for the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf

Islamic Arts by Jonathan Bloom and Sheila Blair. ArtArch | N6260 .B576 1997

The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter. ArtArch | N6260 .P67 2012

If you are looking for books to read, check out this post, this post, this post, and this post.

Bridging Cultures: Pathways of Faith

Since we just finished our Muslim Journeys book discussions, I wanted to highlight the Pathways of Faith theme from our Bridging Cultures collection, in case you want even more books to read! Here are the books we have from that collection:

The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam by F. E. Peters. King Library (2nd floor) | BM157 .P47 2004 

Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan A. C. Brown. King Library (2nd floor) | BP75 .B66 2011

The Story of the Qur’an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life by Ingrid Mattson.  King Library (2nd floor) | BP132 .M39 2008

The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter.  ArtArch | N6260 .P67 2012

Rumi: Poet and Mystic, edited and translated by Reynold A. Nicholson.  King Library (2nd floor) | PK6480.E4 N53 2012

You can check out previous books we highlighted in this post, this post, and this post.

Introducing Unlimited New York Times (NYTimes.com) Access!

Miami University Libraries in partnership with the Center for Research Libraries has negotiated a site license for unlimited, individual access to the online edition of the New York Times. Directions on how to register are below and in an attachment. More information can be found here.  Your subscription includes daily access to the online edition of the NYT, including blogs, web exclusive content and multimedia. For more information feel free to contact your library liaison or use our Ask Us services.  You can also stop by our Information Desks at all of our locations on the Oxford campus to register.

Miami University Access to the New York Times (Group Pass)

Miami University Libraries Academic Site License using NYTimes Group Passes provides users with full access to NYTimes.com and the NYTimes.com smartphone apps.

  • Enjoy access to NYTimes.com from any device.
  • Once activated from within your school’s network, THEN a NYTimes.com Group Pass can be used from any location for the duration of your license period.

New Users:  How to Activate a Pass

While physically on campus and within your school’s network:

1.     Go to nytimes.com/grouppass.  

2.     Create a NYTimes.com account using your school email address.  If you already have a NYTimes.com account using your school email address, you may log in with those credentials.

3.     When you see START YOUR ACCESS, the expiration time and date of your pass will appear. 

4.     Go to NYTimes.com and enjoy your full access from any location!

5.     You will need to renew your registration every 180 days, as prompted by the NYT.

Top 5 Fiction Books about Games

In honor of our recent Summer Reading book Reality is Broken, I wanted to highlight our top 5 fiction books about games.

1. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. Ready Player One takes place in the not-so-distant future--the world has turned into a very bleak place, but luckily there is OASIS, a virtual reality world that is a vast online utopia. People can plug into OASIS to play, go to school, earn money, and even meet other people (or at least they can meet their avatars), and for protagonist Wade Watts it certainly beats passing the time in his grim, poverty-stricken real life. Along with millions of other world-wide citizens, Wade dreams of finding three keys left behind by James Halliday, the now-deceased creator of OASIS and the richest man to have ever lived. The keys are rumored to be hidden inside OASIS, and whoever finds them will inherit Halliday's fortune. 

2. Jumanji, written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg. Left on their own for an afternoon, two bored and restless children find more excitement than they bargained for in a mysterious and mystical jungle adventure board game.

3. Reamde by Neal Stephenson. When his own high-tech start up turns into a Fortune 500 computer gaming group, Richard Forthrast, the black sheep of an Iowa family who has amassed an illegal fortune, finds the line between fantasy and reality becoming blurred when a virtual war for dominance is triggered.

4. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. Aliens have attacked Earth twice and almost destroyed the human species. To make sure humans win the next encounter, the world government has taken to breeding military geniuses -- and then training them in the arts of war... The early training, not surprisingly, takes the form of 'games'... Ender Wiggin is a genius among geniuses; he wins all the games... He is smart enough to know that time is running out. But is he smart enough to save the planet?

5. The Player of Games by Iain M. Banks. The Culture - a human/machine symbiotic society - has thrown up many great Game Players, and one of the greatest is Gurgeh. Jernau Morat Gurgeh. The Player of Games. Master of every board, computer and strategy. Bored with success, Gurgeh travels to the Empire of Azad, cruel and incredibly wealthy, to try their fabulous game...a game so complex, so like life itself, that the winner becomes emperor. Mocked, blackmailed, almost murdered, Gurgeh accepts the game, and with it the challenge of his life - and very possibly his death.

If that's not enough for you, you might also want to check out our For the Amusement of Youth exhibit in Special Collections, which runs until May 16th on the third floor of King!

2014 National Poetry Month

King Library will have a display up this month in the foyer of the first floor in honor of National Poetry Month. This year we are highlighting Walt Whitman.  Many consider Walt Whitman to be one of our greatest American poets.  Apple has even used one of his poems in a recent commercial. We'll be sharing books we have in the library by and about him, interesting online resources, and links to some of his poetry.

Resources and books in the Library

Leaves of grass. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3201 1959a

Leaves of grass : the complete 1855 and 1891-92 editions. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3201 2011

Complete prose works : Specimen days and Collect, November boughs and Good bye my fancy.  King Library (2nd floor) | PS3202 1898b

Selected poems. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3203 .B624 2003

When I heard the learn'd astronomer. King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PS3222 .W335 2004 | AVAILABLE

Song of myself : a sourcebook and critical edition. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3222 .S6 2005

Walt Whitman and the American reader. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3237.4.U6 G74 1990

The Continuing presence of Walt Whitman : the life after the life. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3238 .C59 1992

A companion to Walt Whitman. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3238 .C57 2006

We are also lucky to have a lot of great materials by and about Walt Whitman in our Special Collections, including some older editions of Leaves of Grass.  Check out the list here and consider a trip to the third floor of King!

Interesting Online Resources

Walt Whitman Archive. This digital project has a wealth of primary sources, including digitized manuscripts and photos.  It even has what is thought to be a recording of his voice.

@TweetsOfGrass.  People on Twitter may enjoy following this account.  It is the 1855 Leaves of Grass, little by little, over and over.

Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site

Links to some of his poetry.

O Me! O Life!

O Captain! My Captain!

I Hear America Singing

I Sing the Body Electric

The Year of Reading (Arab) Women

Since it's still Women's History Month, I want to take a moment to highlight the Year of Reading Women campaign.  You can follow the hashtag #readwomen2014 on Twitter for some great recommendations.

Here at the library we have been putting on variou programs for our Muslim Journeys grant, so I want to focus specifically on reading Arab women.  Here's a great blog post that was written about Arab women writers from the Arabic Literature (in English) blog.

They recommend a different novel for every month, and luckily we either own many of those books, or they are available through OhioLINK:

January: Hanan al-Shaykh, Story of Zahra, trans Peter Ford. 

February: Adania Shibli, Touch, trans. Paula Haydar. Or, if you prefer, We Are All Equally Far from Love, trans. Paul Starkey. 

March: Samar Yazbek, Woman in the Crossfire, trans Max Weiss. 

April: Hoda Barakat, Tiller of Waters, trans. Marilyn Booth. 

May: Sahar Khalifeh, Of Noble Origins, trans. Aida Bamia. 

June: Alexandra Chrietieh, Always Coca-Cola, trans. Michelle Hartman. 

July: Iman Humaydan Younes, Wild Mulberries, trans. Michelle Hartman. 

August: Radwa Ashour, Woman of Tantoura. 

September: Najwa Barakat, Salaam!, trans. Luke Leafgren. 

October: Iman Mersal, These Are Not Oranges, My Love,  Khaled Mattawa. 

November: Miral al-Tahawy, Brooklyn Heights, trans. Samah Selim. 

December: Betool Khedairi, Absent, trans.  Muhayman Jamil. 

See the above mentioned blog post for detailed descriptions of each work.

You might also want to consider coming to our next book discussion about Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi, which will take place on April 17th at 4:00 pm in King 320.

8th Annual Women's Read-In

The Women’s Read-in is in its 8th year at the Miami University Libraries. It is co-sponsored by the Women's Center and is held in honor of Women's History Month. All members of the University and Oxford communities are encouraged to participate and attend. The theme this year is Celebrating Freedom of Expression.  We will be focusing especially on Freedom Summer and Female Civil Rights activists, but any readings/performances by women are welcomed.

The event this year will be held on Tuesday March 18th from 11:30am-3:00pm in King Library 320.

You can register here to read/perform work by your favorite female artist or drop by to listen and enjoy refreshments.

Need some help choosing what to read? Check out our page for some inspiration!

Dreams of Trespass Book Discussion

Miami University Libraries will be hosting its last Muslim Journeys* Book Discussion on April 17th from 4:00 to 5:00 in King 320. There will be a short presentation from a scholar, a discussion of the book, and light refreshments. Our scholar for this book will be Dr. Liz Wilson, Comparative Religion.

Our fifth book will be Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi.  You can find out more about this book and the other books we will be reading in our discussion series here.  Here are two primary documents to provide context for this work: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's Visit to a Harem and The Harem and the Revolutionary Gentlewomen of Egypt.  You might also find this map and timeline useful.

Her website is also worth checking out.  Plus we have a lot of her other books in our collection.

We encourage you to sign up for the book discussions so that you can receive free copies of the selected books. You can read more about our Muslim Journeys programming on the website.  

If you are interested in even more books to read, check out some of the books from our bookshelf: Bridging Cultures: Literary ReflectionsBridging Cultures: American Stories, and Bridging Cultures: Connected Histories.

*Our Muslim Journeys programming is sponsored by the American Library Association, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Miami University Humanities Center.  Additional support provided by the Miami University Center for American and World Cultures and the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati.

Broken Verses Book Discussion

Miami University Libraries will be hosting its fourth Muslim Journeys* Book Discussion on March 6th from 4:00 to 5:00 in King 320. There will be a short presentation from a scholar, a discussion of the book, and light refreshments. Our scholar for this book will be Dr. Fauzia Ahmed, Sociology and Women's & Gender Studies.

Our fourth book will be Broken Verses by Kamila Shamsie.  You can find out more about this book and the other books we will be reading in our discussion series here.  Here is a review you might useful. These resources will also be useful: an interview, a map, and a timeline. You might also find this recent online discussion Kamila Shamsie had with the author Pankaj Mishra interesting.

We encourage you to sign up for the book discussions so that you can receive free copies of the selected books. You can read more about our Muslim Journeys programming on the website.

If you are interested in even more books to read, check out some of the books from our bookshelf: Bridging Cultures: Literary Reflections, Bridging Cultures: American Stories, and Bridging Cultures: Connected Histories.

*Our Muslim Journeys programming is sponsored by the American Library Association, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Miami University Humanities Center.  Additional support provided by the Miami University Center for American and World Cultures and the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati.

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